Category: Book of the Month

Which Way?

The purpose of taking November off from ‘organised’ work was twofold, as those of you paying attention will know. Firstly it was to get NanoWriMo not just to 50k words but beyond (which is what has happened, more on which will be retro posted in the next 24 hours.) Secondly, […]

The Great Big IoW Survey

I promised, back at the end of October, that I’d be giving everyone who reads my blog (i.e., THE ENTIRE INTERNET) a chance to offer feedback on the Internet of Words content thus far. As I am a woman of my word, there’s now a lovely Survey available (via the […]

Beautiful Dreamer

Okay, next week is November, and I need to get my arse in gear. There’s a plan in place for Haiku to cover the entire month (more on that on Monday) and I’m going to announce on that day the subject matter for the month’s worth of Micropoetry in one hit. […]

Book of the Month: Seed

This month, I’ve tried to channel Ian McEwan in my own short story, inspired by his work. I hope you enjoy the result. In my head, you and I are lovers… There is dust on the picture frame: light dusting of decay, inescapable march of time unhindered. Her smile however […]

Book of the Month :: From Page to Screen

Most of my friends, if asked, could cite at least one favourite literary work that has been ruined during the process of adaptation from page to (small or large) screen. For me, it was the cinematic version of The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy: immediately obvious that it would […]

Book of the Month :: Traversing the Fringes

  In my youth, I read a remarkable amount of science fiction, the majority of which was fairly safe and non-confrontational fare. In the summer of 1984, as an impressionable and naive 18-year-old, I was urged by a friend to read Iain Banks’ The Wasp Factory and overnight my literary outlook […]

Book of the Month :: An Introduction to the Challenging

I’m taking what might be a bit of a risk with the choice for October’s Book of the Month, the subject matter of which is not only difficult but considered by some as genuinely disturbing. I began reading The Comfort of Strangers on its release in 1981: the fact I […]