GSME #7 :: The Old Songs

Last week, as those of you who follow my other blogs will know, was not exactly me on top mental and physical form. As a result, you would imagine that my experiment might suffer. Instead, I’m beginning to see some genuine return from the good foundations being laid.

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The bars may be down, but in reality engagements are up, coming close to 25k a day. Slowly but surely that rate is staying above a certain threshold too. It is a combination of curation, sharing and an increased use of the visual via artist sharing and Instagram that has helped, but also understanding that if you pitch the right things at the correct audience, amazing things will happen.

The bald guy top left in the picture set here is my mate, and he opened the shop named after his hobby at the weekend. His son is in my daughter’s year at school, and we had many conversations on the School playground before Secondary education sent our children their separate ways. I know he’s given up his old job to make Retro Gaming his full-time profession, and as a result deserves as much help as I can give him, so on Saturday I took some pictures on the phone and sent this out onto the Internet, making sure it hit a few of the right people along the way. This is now my third best performing tweet of the last 28 days, and is living proof that a) pictures sell posts and b) they gain more views if you ensure the right people see them.

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I screenied this last night, yet this morning people are still picking this up and bouncing it around the Retro Gaming community. I get nothing at all out of this either, which is the bigger point to make: I have only a passing interest in Retro but I’m more concerned in getting @TheRetroHunter the exposure I can offer, being at the intersection of where past and present overlap. As of time of writing, this has topped 6k views and at a point on Sunday was exceeding an almost mythical 20% engagement. Having one in five of your audience being interest is truly the stuff of legends, people. If you know the right people to talk to and the correct places to target? Twitter really is an incredible tool for advertising.

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The key here, of course, is that nobody paid for anything. It is proof, if it were needed, that the best advertising is word of mouth and altruism. Having said that, paying for the right things also does have benefit. Behold my boost on CoPromote from last week, which I managed to generate without any purchased ‘reach’:

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Up for 3 days, it bounced around for a while and got me 130k views but, yet again, the physical return for my effort appears to have been negligible in actual interest. This week, therefore, it is time to look at what content I can provide that will retain more of an audience, including a greater use of Twitter Cards in my ‘advertising’. This is one part of the free advertising toolbox I’m criminally underusing, and as a result we’ll be all over the process until I see you again. For now, if you like a retro game and wanna help my mate out, go visit his Facebook page 😀

GSME #6 :: Fade To Grey

As is sometimes the case in Experiments, this week hasn’t exactly gone as I’d planned. However, before we begin, let’s look at the old Engagement scoreboard:

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There’s a few things to mention, most notable of which is that in the last seven days I didn’t use CoPromote at all and still the numbers are up. That will change this week, as I’ve almost built up 100k ‘credit’ to use on something worthwhile, but it is as much about writing a decent post to hook people in to reading long-term as it is just churning out rubbish, which seems to be how some people view Twitter to begin with. The plan going forward had been to boost myself using Twitter’s own range of ‘advertising’ tools and last night I cleared a block of space and time to do just this.

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The range of options is pretty decent: I can, it appears, pay money to get followers (recommended for accounts with an audience of under 1000, I’m told) plus be charged in any myriad number of ways. This was the first thing that put me off: what I could manage for the cash I have available was woeful at best. Obviously the more you pay, the better your chances of reaching people, though it would be unfair to say that’s the only way this works, because it isn’t. An awful lot of Twitter’s advertising however expects you to not only specifically identify and target an audience, but understand how that works to begin with, and I can see this putting off huge numbers of potential smaller users.

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The fact remains, that if paying a tenner A DAY for what might only be seven clicks is not, it must be said, the optimal use of my cash. In fact, if I’m honest, CoPromote’s reach function did more than that, and I pay $19.99 a MONTH. The only difference is what is promised in terms of Impressions, and I can make that happen myself via persistence and little grey cells. Maybe this is part of the reason why Twitter as a company fails to make money but continues to win in terms of being the most organic and accessible of mediums. Perhaps if they tweaked their selling model for smaller sellers, there might be an upswing in interest.

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It doesn’t take a genius to understand how the basic principles operate, but the work involved for me in identifying a niche audience (which is effectively what I am, like it or not) is not currently worth the return. If I were a Warcraft streamer, however, this could have some genuine merit, or indeed if I was trying to sell my product in a larger market. In that regard, and because I know a number of people have been waiting to see what I think of this, I’d say it may well be worth the effort if you have the cash to back it up. It will also help if your market is well known, and can be easily targetted using specific keywords. I have so many applicable keywords right now for what I do, and as I currently refuse to refine those terms? This is a service I can happily leave well alone.

In fact, you’ll probably get far more out of this completely free guide to optimising your account than is ever going to result from a small business using Twitter ads. As is also the case with Facebook, these companies seem to only be interested in those prepared to spend big in able to make their point, and that effectively prices me completely out of the marketplace. More importantly, I get to help out a friend by granting her post a few extra views, which I’d far rather do than chuck money at a huge company that doesn’t seem that interested in my business to begin with.

Sometimes, your answer means not taking the obvious route.

GSME #5 :: Big Time

This last week’s been quite the revelation for Social Media use, especially when it comes to the notion of popularity. When I show you the bar graph, it should be noted that I’m actually down on impressions for the larger period. However, what I got from the last seven days is very significant indeed:

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I told you that I’d dropped some cash to use CoPromote, which is a sharing platform to allow content creators to reach a larger audience. It was developed initially to allow musicians to increase their reach on various platforms, which includes Facebook, Instagram and Tumblr. My main interest however is Twitter, and I boosted two posts in the last seven days. The results in terms of increasing reach were, it must be said, pretty extraordinary:

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This was the first boost, which I ended yesterday, and as you can see, the stats are pretty impressive. However, you really need to see Twitter’s own figures to put those massive percentages in a proper context:

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CoPromote tells me I reached over half a million viewers, yet the tweet itself only garnered a shade over 6 thousand impressions. Of those, a palty TWO were media engagement. This means, effectively, half a million people utterly ignored this blog post. I know that’s a fact too: I can show you the WordPress stats for last week that effectively prove that point:

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Last week, with TWO active boosts, I almost hit 100 views on Friday, with almost being the operative word. The only reason that happened was because I had two active boosts at that time: here’s the second, with its Twitter stats alongside for comparison:

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In effect, $19.99 has done nothing for my aspirations of reaching a wider audience that reads my work. What that money gives me, however, is the ABILITY to reach half a million people a month in the hope that I can convince them with one, possibly two tweets, that I’m worthwhile engaging with. What I buy with that subscription, I now grasp, is not an instant audience, merely the possibility of one. To make the most of this new-found ability isn’t just a case of firing the same shit out over and over again. I read reviews of this service saying it has no usefulness because you can’t get people to pay attention, but I know that’s not the case. You can make an impact, but only with the right content.

This effectively gives me a month to plan ahead until my $19.99 restocks the Karma bank. To explain what that means, we need to look at how CoPromote works:

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When you first join, a reach score is calculated for the number of Twitter followers you possess, plus any other social network sites you choose to connect (in this case I’m just using my Facebook page to begin with.) Then, my Subscription allows a 500,000 Reach to be automatically applied to the account as a starting point. Every time I share someone else’s post? I get Reach added (green numbers above) and every time someone else shares my post, their Reach on Twitter is deducted from my overall total, hence the Karma aspect. You can, of course, do this for free, but you need to share a PHENOMENAL number of posts in order to build enough reach to justify the action.

The system of filtering and picking posts is not great, but perfectly acceptable: the problem, at least for me is finding content that is relevant to my interests. More importantly still, to make this worthwhile I would have to fill both Facebook and Twitter pretty much daily with content I know full well my current readership would have absolutely no interest in. CoPromote seems to assume that the reason why you use their system isn’t to engage, but simply to advertise, and that’s not why I do social media to begin with. Sadly, this is the mindset of too many people, including Twitter themselves, who are more interested in making money from the platform than promoting the altruistic benefits.

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I’m yet to be convinced this isn’t worth my time however, and so we will continue the slow drip of building Karma again until I have something worthwhile to highlight. My next 500k ‘boost’ will be on April 20th and by then I will have not only have had the chance to refine the searching process and build up a group of other Promoters with interests that better mesh with mine, but to present content that will engage more readers and invite them to read my content, not simply scroll on by. A good workman never blames her tools, after all: it is how you use the things you are given in the best way to produce the most effective results.

This week, as a comparison to this process, I intend to boost the same blog post using both Facebook and Twitter’s own advertising tools. I think I’m more nervous about this than I have been about anything done for a while, but unless you take risks, you’ll never know the benefits.

The only way to find out is to try.